List of Free and Public DNS Resolvers

Here is a list I compiled of free and public DNS resolvers you can use. Hopefully this will save you some time looking for an alternative DNS resolver.

Last Updated: August 2022

Name IP Address & Notes
Cloudflare

1.1.1.1

1.0.0.1


No DNS filtering; everything allowed

Cloudflare

1.1.1.2


Filters malware domains; useful if you have a public Internet service (e.g., library, coffee shop)

Cloudflare

1.1.1.3


Filters malware & adult content

Google

8.8.8.8

8.8.4.4


Google Public DNS is purely a DNS resolution and caching server; it does not perform any blocking or filtering of any kind, except that it may not resolve certain domains in extraordinary cases if we believe this is necessary to protect Google’s users from security threats.as of August 2022

Quad9

9.9.9.9

149.112.112.112

2620:fe::fe  [IPv6]

2620:fe::9  [IPv6]


Filters malware domains & DNSSEC validation

Quad9

9.9.9.11

149.112.112.11

2620:fe::11  [IPv6]

2620:fe::fe:11  [IPv6]


Filters malware domains & DNSSEC validation + ECS enabled

Quad9

9.9.9.10

149.112.112.10

2620:fe::10  [IPv6]

2620:fe::fe:10  [IPv6]


No malware domain filtering, no DNSSEC validation

OpenDNS

208.67.222.222

208.67.220.220


Without an OpenDNS account, supposedly it blocks some malware and phishing domains; with an account, you can have much more control over what it blocks and does not block

 


Posted in Computers, Internet and Servers, Software, Tips & Tutorials

Happy 4th of July (2022)

𝓟𝓻𝓪𝔂 𝓯𝓸𝓻 𝓸𝓾𝓻 𝓝𝓪𝓽𝓲𝓸𝓷 𝓪𝓷𝓭 𝓲𝓽𝓼 𝓛𝓮𝓪𝓭𝓮𝓻𝓼𝓱𝓲𝓹!

“Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord” – Psalm 33:12a (NASB)

“and My people who are called by My name humble themselves and pray and seek My face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, will forgive their sin and will heal their land.” – 2 Chronicles 7:14 (NASB)

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 4th_of_July_2020_enhanced.jpg
 
 
 

 


Posted in Holiday

Test-Connection: How to Ping Computers with PowerShell

You can use the commands below to ping computers with PowerShell.

 

Pinging a Single Computer

Test-Connection google.com

You may add (without the quotes) “-IPv4” to the end of the command to tell PowerShell to only ping the IPv4 address of the specified computer.

 

Pinging Multiple Computers

Use a comma [ , ] to specify multiple computers at once.

Test-Connection google.com, bing.com, yahoo.com


Posted in Code Snippet, Computers, Internet and Servers, Operating Systems, PowerShell, Tips & Tutorials

How to Set Up NVIDIA G-Sync for Gaming

Below I will give you my personal NVIDIA control panel settings I use for G-Sync that gives me smooth game play (results may vary).

Prerequisites

  • NVIDIA video card (obviously)
  • latest NVIDIA drivers
  • Windows 10 or above
    • these settings should work in older versions of Windows, but I have not tested that assumption
  • G-Sync or FreeSync compatible monitor
    • FreeSync is AMD’s version of G-Sync
    • NVIDIA (thankfully) allows FreeSync monitors to work with their proprietary G-Sync technology without you having to fork out a lot of money for a G-Sync “certified” monitor.
  • You must enable your monitor’s G-Sync or FreeSync technology (it is usually disabled by default)
    • On my FreeSync monitor (Samsung LS28AG700N), the setting is called “Adaptive-Sync”. I do not know if other FreeSync monitors have it labeled “Adaptive-Sync” too, but the naming should be similar.
    • If you own a real G-Sync monitor, look for a similar option to enable.
  • Set your monitor to use 120Hz or higher refresh rate
    • While you can use G-Sync with a 60Hz refresh rate, it really does you no good (I tried it; waste of my time; G-Sync works better with a 120Hz or higher refresh rate).

Ok. First you need to open the NVIDIA Control Panel. Usually you can right-click on your Windows desktop and select “NVIDIA Control Panel”.

Once the NVIDIA Control Panel opens, click on the option called “Set up G-SYNC”.

Please note that this option will not be visible if your monitor’s FreeSync (“Adaptive-Sync”) or G-Sync technology is not turned on.

Now set your settings just like I show in the picture below.

Once you set the settings, you need to click on the “Apply” button to save your settings.

Before we go on, you may want to turn on the G-Sync indicator as shown below.

This will tell the NVIDIA driver to display a green “G-Sync” text on the top-right of a window or full-screen application that is currently making use of G-Sync. This is a very helpful indicator letting you know if your G-Sync is working properly in a particular program.

Now we need to go to setup a few more things. On the menu to the left, click on “Manage 3D settings”.

Below I have highlighted the settings I use specifically for G-Sync. Set your settings like I have shown below.

Important Note: The “Max Frame Rate” works well when it is -3 your monitor fresh rate. For example, if your monitor is running at 120Hz (like mine), set the “Max Frame Rate” to 117 instead of 120. This works well for me. Likewise, if you have a 144Hz monitor, set the “Max Frame Rate” to 141 instead of 144.

Important Note #2: If you have frequent stuttering when playing games, try setting the “Low Latency Mode” to “Off” and see if that solves the problem. “Low Latency Mode” does not always play nice with everyone’s computer systems and games.

Scroll down to view the rest of the options.

As mentioned before, please remember to click the “Apply” button to save your settings.

G-Sync should now work. Open up a video game and – if you enabled the G-Sync indicator I mentioned earlier – you should see a green “G-Sync” text on the upper-right of your screen.

I hope this small tutorial has been helpful to someone.


Posted in Computers, Software, Tips & Tutorials, Video Games